The following posts have been tagged with "soccer trap"...

Soccer Trap


(aka “Receive“) There are occasions when a soccer player should literally trap the soccer ball; for example, if an “air ball” is coming at his feet, he can use the bottom of his foot to trap the ball against the ground. However, when someone uses the term “trap” or “trapping”, they usually mean “receive” or “receiving”. The terms trap & trapping are falling out of use in favor of “receive” & “receiving”. Years ago, the objective was to “trap” the ball using the feet, chest, thigh, etc. Today, soccer play is more sophisticated & the objective is usually not to “trap” the ball, but to receive the ball so it goes in the direction & the distance that is advantageous for the soccer receiver (e.g., left, right, or forward and toward open space away from defenders).


Soccer Receive


(aka “Trap”). Receiving the soccer ball used to be called “trapping” the soccer ball, but today most people use the term “receiving”. Receiving is a very important skill that every coach should teach. A soccer player can “receive” the soccer ball on a pass or a loose ball. The soccer ball is usually received with the foot (inside, outside, top or bottom), but it can also be received with the chest, head, thigh, or any part of the body except the arms (the definition of “arm” is the movable part of the arm up to where the arm joins the shoulder). See “Trap” and “Hand Ball“. I strongly recommend you teach “Passing to Space” and “Aggressive Receiving” — Passing to Space is easier for beginning soccer players and will result in much better ball movement, better ball possession, use of Open Space and “field vision”. Aggressive Receiving is a better way to teach receiving and will result in a big improvement in your soccer players and their ability to retain the soccer ball.


Soccer Receive and Move


The receiver should know if a defender is close by and, if so, he should move toward the soccer ball on a pass & receive the soccer ball so it is shielded from the defender or block it into open space away from the defender. Receiving is a very important skill that every soccer coach should teach. A soccer player can “receive” the soccer ball on a pass or a loose ball. The soccer ball is usually received with the foot (inside, outside, top or bottom), but it can also be received with the chest, head, thigh, or any part of the body except the arms (the definition of “arm” is the movable part of the arm up to where the arm joins the shoulder). See “Trap” and “Hand Ball“.


Soccer Offside Trap


When defenders (often a “flat defense”) intentionally move forward to try to “trap” an attacker who doesn’t have the soccer ball in an offside position. Don’t try to teach this to youth soccer teams; it is too complex. However, you can teach your soccer team to stay 12-18 steps away from your goal when the other soccer team has a Free Kick, which is a similar concept and will keep the attackers from scoring on headers or rebounds off the Free Kick. (Defenders must stay 10 yards from the soccer ball on free kicks, so this will only work if the kick is from 20-30 yards out). Remember, the Offside Rule is in effect on Free Kicks. (See “Flat Defense” and “Offside Rule, Detailed“).