The following posts have been tagged with "soccer strength on the ball"...

Soccer Strength On The Ball


Refers to how hard it is to steal (i.e., “dispossess”) the ball from the ballhandler. You will notice that it is easy to steal the ball from some players but difficult to steal the ball from others. The difference depends on footwork, shielding & “strength on the ball”. To protect the ball, the ballhandler should shift it to the foot farthest from the opponent and, if the opponent is close by, prepare for a “Shoulder Charge” by bending his knees, bracing himself & stiffening the arm closest to the opponent. Players should always keep their knees bent, even if they don’t have the ball. At advanced levels, the ballhandler will stay very low when defenders are close by & may drop his shoulder to keep from getting pushed off the ball. You want your players to have “strength on the ball” so they are not easily pushed off the ball. (See “Shielding“, “Shoulder Charge” & “Drag The Ball“).


Soccer Shoulder Charge


(aka “Fair Charging”). A type of “tackle” which can be legally used to try to “win” (i.e., gain possession of) the ball. To be legal, it: (a) cannot take place from behind (b) is only permitted within playing distance (i.e., 3 feet) of the ball (c) cannot be violent or dangerous (d) must be intended to win the ball & not just to knock down the opponent (e) must be shoulder to shoulder (not to the opponents chest or back) with the arms (especially elbows) close to the body (f) the player must have at least one foot on the ground (i.e., he can’t leap). (See “Tackle“, “Fouls“, “Shielding“, “Strength On the Ball” & “Win The Ball“).


Soccer Shield


(aka Screen). When a soccer player legally positions his body so the defender can’t touch the soccer ball without fouling. (e.g., The ballhandler shifts the soccer ball to his foot that is farthest from the defender, stays low with his knees bent & feet apart so he can’t get easily pushed off the soccer ball & stiffens the arm nearest the defender; the arm can’t be used to push the defender but it can point down & slightly out so he’s ready to withstand a “Shoulder Charge”). See “Strength On the Ball” & “Shoulder Charge“.


Soccer Attacking


(aka “Offense”). When a soccer team has the soccer ball they are generally referred to as “attacking”, no matter where the ball is on the soccer field. There are 2 different styles of soccer attacking: a direct soccer attack and an “indirect soccer attack. A direct attack tries to move the ball quickly into scoring range by using mostly forward soccer passes, through balls and breakaways. An indirect attack is slower and uses a lot of sideways or backward passes while searching for a weakness in the defense. Unless your team is very skilled and has excellent passing ability a direct soccer attack will work best. (See “Styles of Play” for more details). Creating soccer space is a very important part of attacking. There are 2 different ways to create space. One relies on the ballhandler (i.e., the soccer player “onball”) to create opportunities. The other way to create space is by movement off the soccer ball & relies on movement by players other than the ballhandler (i.e., players “off-the-ball”) to create space & to create opportunities. (See “Soccer Attacking Plan“, “Soccer Attacking Third“, “Create“, “Soccer Dribbling“, “Go To Soccer Goal“, “Soccer Kick-Off“, “Pass To Space“, “Shift & Sag – Soccer“, “Strength On The Ball“, “Through Ball“, “Push Up“, “Build An Attack From The Back“, “Center The Ball“, “Coaching Rules“, “Commit The Defender“, “Counterattack“, “Creating Space“, “Cross The Ball“, “Defending to Win“, “Direct Attack“, “Finish“, “First Attacker“, “Soccer Formations“, “Soccer Goal Kick“, “Movement Off The Soccer Ball“, “Soccer Possession Style“, “Rebound“, “Release“, “Spread The Soccer Field“, “Styles of Soccer Play“, “Soccer Support“, “Switch The Soccer Play“, “Soccer – When to Dribble/When to Pass“, “Width In Soccer Attack“, “Win The Soccer Ball“.