The following posts have been tagged with "soccer shoulder charge"...

Soccer Win The Ball


The soccer term “win the ball” means to gain possession of the soccer ball, often when it is a loose ball or a ball which the other team also has a chance to win. Winning the ball is very important. The team that “wins the ball” the most usually wins the soccer game. Like in basketball, positioning relative to opponents can increase the chance of being able to win the ball. Hustle, speed, a quick start and not being afraid of contact are also important, especially on fifty-fifty soccer balls (i.e., loose balls which either team has an equal chance of winning). For example, if you are on defense, a good strategy is to stay behind the opponent. This will allow you to step in front and steal the ball or to defend the opponent even if he gets the ball. (Whereas if you play in front of the opponent and the ball gets past you, the other team might be able to fastbreak toward your goal). When on offense, good soccer positioning on your team’s goal kicks might be to stay beside the opponent so you have a chance to win both short and long balls. If your team controls the ball, you should try to get open for a soccer pass so you don’t have to fight to win the ball. Whether on offense or defense a soccer player should always be aware of where the nearest opponent is and if an opponent is nearby the attacker will often run to meet a pass so the opponent can’t beat him to it. (See “Soccer Attacking“, and “Soccer Shoulder Charge“).


Soccer Tackle


To steal the ball. Mostly done while standing (see “Shoulder Charge” & “Block Tackle“), but also see “Slide Tackle“. (Also see “Fouls“).


Soccer Strength On The Ball


Refers to how hard it is to steal (i.e., “dispossess”) the ball from the ballhandler. You will notice that it is easy to steal the ball from some players but difficult to steal the ball from others. The difference depends on footwork, shielding & “strength on the ball”. To protect the ball, the ballhandler should shift it to the foot farthest from the opponent and, if the opponent is close by, prepare for a “Shoulder Charge” by bending his knees, bracing himself & stiffening the arm closest to the opponent. Players should always keep their knees bent, even if they don’t have the ball. At advanced levels, the ballhandler will stay very low when defenders are close by & may drop his shoulder to keep from getting pushed off the ball. You want your players to have “strength on the ball” so they are not easily pushed off the ball. (See “Shielding“, “Shoulder Charge” & “Drag The Ball“).


Soccer Shoulder Tackle


Another term for “Shoulder Charge”. See Shoulder Charge.


Soccer Shoulder Charge


(aka “Fair Charging”). A type of “tackle” which can be legally used to try to “win” (i.e., gain possession of) the ball. To be legal, it: (a) cannot take place from behind (b) is only permitted within playing distance (i.e., 3 feet) of the ball (c) cannot be violent or dangerous (d) must be intended to win the ball & not just to knock down the opponent (e) must be shoulder to shoulder (not to the opponents chest or back) with the arms (especially elbows) close to the body (f) the player must have at least one foot on the ground (i.e., he can’t leap). (See “Tackle“, “Fouls“, “Shielding“, “Strength On the Ball” & “Win The Ball“).


Soccer Shield


(aka Screen). When a soccer player legally positions his body so the defender can’t touch the soccer ball without fouling. (e.g., The ballhandler shifts the soccer ball to his foot that is farthest from the defender, stays low with his knees bent & feet apart so he can’t get easily pushed off the soccer ball & stiffens the arm nearest the defender; the arm can’t be used to push the defender but it can point down & slightly out so he’s ready to withstand a “Shoulder Charge”). See “Strength On the Ball” & “Shoulder Charge“.


Soccer Rules


The basic soccer rules are described in these Definitions. See “Advantage Clause“, “Cards”, “Fouls”, “Hand Ball”, “Offside Rule”, “Shoulder Charge”, “Assistant Referee”, “FIFA”, “Corner Kick”, “Free Kick”, “Goal Kick”, “Kick Off”, “Lines“, “Penalty Kick”, “Substitutions” & “Throw-Ins”. Also, see “Rules” and “Safety Rules”, Basic Information & Tips for Beginning Coaches. Soccer rules are revised annually by FIFA. You can visit www.fifa.com. for the latest official soccer rules, which are called the “Laws of The Game”.


Soccer Playing Distance


Within 3 feet of the soccer ball. (Several rules make reference to “Playing Distance” without defining it; “Obstruction” & “Shoulder Charge“, for example).


Soccer Fair Charging


See “Soccer Shoulder Charge“.