The following posts have been tagged with "soccer penalty box"...

Soccer Punting


The key to consistent punting is to face the target “square” & a consistent drop. Children’s hands are small. Teach your young goalkeepers to hold the soccer ball with 2 hands, fully extend the arms & drop the soccer ball from waist height. This will result in a consistent drop. If punts are too low (not enough height) it means the soccer ball is being contacted too low. If too much height & not enough distance, it is being contacted too high. The goalkeeper has six seconds after picking up the soccer ball to punt it or release it. He is allowed to pick it up, run with it and then punt, throw it, or drop it and dribble or kick it. However, he cannot touch it with his hands outside the “Penalty Box” and once he drops it he can’t touch it again with his hands until an opponent has touched it. (See “Fouls, Indirect“, “Distribute“, “Goalkeeper” & “Penalty Box“).


Soccer Penalty Box Arc


(aka The “D”). See “Penalty Box“, “Field Diagram” & “D“.


Soccer Penalty Box


(aka Penalty Area, “Box” or “Eighteen”). The large box in front of the soccer goal in which the goalkeeper can touch the soccer ball with hands. The half circle at the top of this box is the Penalty Box Arc. Size will vary by age group & your soccer club rules. On adult sized soccer fields, the Penalty Box extends 18 yards from the Goal Line into the soccer field. For dimensions go to “Laws of the Game” at www.fifa.com. (See “Field Diagram“, “Eighteen“, “Box” & “Penalty Box Arc“).


Soccer Penalty Area


(aka “Penalty Box”, “Box” or “Eighteen”). See “Penalty Box“.


Soccer Penalty


See “Fouls” and “Penalty Box“.


Soccer Goalkeeper


(aka Goalie, Keeper or GK). Except in small-sided play, each team must have a designated goalkeeper. He is the only player on the field who can legally use his hands and then only inside the Penalty Box. (Note that the Goalie cannot pick up the ball if it was deliberately kicked to him by a teammate… he can only pick it up if it was last touched by an opponent or if it was accidentally kicked to him by a teammate, or was passed from a teammate using the head, chest, knee, etc. instead of the feet.) Once he picks up the ball he has six seconds to punt it or release it. He is allowed to pick up the ball, run with it and then punt it, throw it, or drop it and dribble or kick it. (However, he cannot touch it with his hands outside the “Penalty Box” and once he drops it he can’t touch it again with his hands until an opponent has touched it). The goalkeeper has special protections inside the Penalty Box; the ball may not be kicked if he is touching it with his hand or arm and the referee will call a foul if the goalkeeper is endangered. He must wear a shirt or jersey that is recognizably different from all other players (goalkeepers often wear special jerseys with padded elbows). Note: In hot weather, do not put a goalkeeper jersey on a player. They can get too overheated & become sick. Instead, have them wear a different-colored shirt (one shirt only) or a mesh training vest over their shirt. If your goalkeeper has a strong leg, let him take goal kicks. Encourage him to play aggressively & if you push up on the attack, to come out to the edge of the Penalty Box or beyond to play like a “Second Sweeper”. If he picks up the ball & no opponents are close, encourage him to drop the ball & dribble it out & then kick it. (Once he drops it or when out of the Penalty Box, he can play like a field player but can’t touch the ball with his hands). Encourage him to play aggressively & to take chances, everyone will have much more fun if you do & more kids will want to play goal. Goalkeepers tend to get blamed for goals when most of the time it isn’t their fault (if the other defenders are doing a great job there won’t be any shots on goal). You should tell your goalkeeper before the game that the other team is expected to score goals & that it isn’t his fault if they score. Do not let anyone else (players or parents) blame the goalkeeper. In fact, after the game you should have the rest of the team thank the goalkeeper, even if he or she did make mistakes. You should encourage everyone who wants to to take a try at playing goalkeeper. You will be surprised who is good & you really can’t tell until they actually play the position. At the very least, it will give all the players respect for how tough the position is & they will be less likely to blame the goalkeeper when goals are scored. However, do not make a child play goalkeeper if he or she doesn’t want to. (See “Second Sweeper“, “Breakaway“, “Goal Kick“, “Fouls, Indirect Kick“, “Dangerous Play“, “Distribute“, “Penalty Box“, “Punting“, “Overarm Throw” & “Worrying The Goalkeeper“).

For How To Teach Goalkeeping, go to SoccerHelp Premium

(NOTE: If the Goalkeeper “possesses” the ball and “releases” it, then he can only handle it again after an opponent touches it, or if it is accidentally kicked back or headed or chested back by a teammate. He can’t pick it up if a teammate has intentionally kicked or thrown it to him. Notice that this rule only applies if he actually has “possession” of the ball, and not, for example, if he blocks touches a shot with his hands and then picks up the ball to “control” it. So, the important words here are “possession” and “released” — under this rule just touching the ball isn’t the same thing as having “possession” of the ball. However, in terms of protecting the Goalkeeper’s safety, some referees will consider the Goalkeeper to have the ball under his control if he even has one finger on it — this is to discourage attackers from trying to kick the ball out of the Keeper’s hands. Se. 2.b. at Fouls for clarification of this.)


Soccer Eighteen


The soccer term “18″ refers to the soccer Penalty Box line, since on adult sized soccer fields the Penalty Box extends 18 yards from the soccer Goal Line into the field. For example, “inside the 18″ would mean in the Penalty box. (See “Soccer Box” and “Soccer Penalty Box“).


Soccer Distribute


Soccer Goalkeepers “distribute” the ball by kicking, punting or throwing it. Once they pick up the soccer ball, they have six seconds to punt it or release it. They can pick it up, run with it and then punt it, throw it or drop it and dribble it or kick it. (However, they cannot touch it with their hands outside the “Soccer Penalty Box” and once they drop it they can’t touch it again with their hands until an opponent has touched it). They can also put it down on the ground and dribble it outside the Penalty Box like a “field player“. (See “Soccer Punting“, “Sidearm Soccer Throw” & “Soccer Goalkeeper“).


Soccer Box


“In the Box” usually refers to the soccer Penalty Box. The “18″ also refers to being inside the Penalty Box (e.g., “inside the 18″). (See “Penalty Box“).