The following posts have been tagged with "soccer pass to yourself"...

Soccer Verbal Signals


You should encourage your soccer players to talk to each other on the soccer field. There are some typical soccer terms that are used in certain circumstances. Some of these are:

  • “Soccer Man On” (See “Man On”)
  • Soccer Time” – Means a defender is not nearby & the ballhandler has time to dribble or look for a pass. (i.e., don’t rush a play).
  • “Soccer Keeper” – The goalkeeper might yell this to let teammates know they should move aside & let him have the ball (i.e., so he can pick it up or catch a shot)
  • “Back” or “Drop” – Would be yelled by a “trailer” to let a teammate with the ball know that he has support behind him & can play the ball backward if needed.
  • “Soccer Carry” – Continue to dribble the ball.
  • “Pop It” – “Pass To Yourself”.
  • “Send it” – Send a Through Soccer Ball.
  • “Switch” – (See “Switch”)
  • The most useful of the above in Soccer is “Keeper”. It’s hard to teach these. Perhaps the best thing is to introduce them by U-10 or U-12 & encourage talking in general. Small-sided games encourage talking & are another reason they are so beneficial. (See “Show For The Ball”).


    Soccer Through Ball


    (aka Through Pass). A soccer pass between defenders into the open space between the fullbacks & the soccer goalkeeper with the idea that a forward will beat the defenders to the soccer ball. There are 2 types: a “Straight Through Ball” & a “Diagonal Through Ball”). (See “Pass To Space”, “Leading Pass” & “Pass To Yourself”). This is a very important soccer concept to teach & one that I think should be introduced by U-8 & definitely by U-10. By U-12 (& sometimes by U-10) defenders will be “pushing up” & it will become very difficult for attackers to dribble past the “Last Defender”. “Through Balls”, “Passing to Yourself”, “Switching The Play” & “Wall Passes” become the keys to a successful offense. If the other team is having success with through balls, it may be because your soccer defense if “flat” & doesn’t have “depth”. (See “Depth“, “Zone Defense“, “Push Up“, “Last Defender“, “Leading Pass“, “Give & Go“, “Pass To Space“, “Diagonal Through Ball“, “Styles of Play” & “Stretch The Field“).


    Soccer Send It Through


    See “Pass To Space“, “Pass To Yourself” & “Through Ball“.


    Soccer Pop It


    A verbal signal for “Pass To Yourself”. See “Pass To Yourself” & “Verbal Signals“.


    Soccer Pass To Yourself


    (aka “Pop It”). As soccer players get older & better, it becomes very difficult for an attacker to dribble past a defender & passing becomes very important. By U-12, your attack won’t work very well unless your soccer team can “pass”, “pass to space” & “pass to yourself”. One way to beat a defender is to “pass the ball to yourself” by passing the soccer ball to open space behind the defender & then beating him to it. The passer has the advantages of knowing where he is passing it & of forward momentum, while the defender must turn around and gain momentum. This is one way to get through the last line of defenders if they have “pushed up” & in that case is like passing a “through ball” to yourself. This works best if the attacker is faster than the defender. I tell attackers to “pop the ball” past the defender & ideally to chip it or kick an “airball” if they can, since an airball is hardest for a defender to block with his foot. Since they can run faster without dribbling than they can if they are dribbling, I tell them to pop it as far as they can while still beating the defender to it. For example, if they are on the right or left side, they can pop it farther than if they are in the center, because if they kick it too far down the center the goalkeeper will get it. If the defender is faster than the attacker, the attacker won’t be able to pop it very far or the defender will beat him to the soccer ball. Second Attackers and Third Attackers must move up with the soccer ball to support the First Attacker. If a defender gets the soccer ball, the attackers must pressure the defender to try to win back the soccer ball. If they can cause a turnover, they may have a scoring opportunity. (See “Through Ball“, “Hopped Pass“, “Creating Space“, “Verbal Signals“, “First Attacker” & “Pass“). How to teach “Passing to Space” and “Aggressive Receiving” are explained in SoccerHelp Premium.


    Soccer Pass To Space


    Teach players to “pass to space” (i.e., to “open space”) & teach receivers to anticipate passes to space, as opposed to “passing to feet”. These passes are sometimes called “leading passes” (if they are made to space in front of a receiver) or “through passes” (if they are through the defense into the open space behind the defense). This is a very important soccer concept to teach & one that I think should be introduced by U-8 & definitely by U-10. It becomes increasingly important, as soccer players become older, & is very important by U-12. An advantage of this style of play (as opposed to “passing to feet”) is that soccer players learn they must be alert and must go to the ball and not wait for the ball to come to them. Passing to space also encourages “movement off the ball”. (See “Creating Space“, “Leading Pass“, “Through Ball“, “Wall Pass“, “Formations“, “Attacking Plan“, “Styles of Play“, “Pass To Yourself“, “Open Space“, “Pass To Feet“. Also see the Section titled “Scoring More Goals”). I strongly recommend you teach “Passing to Space” and “Aggressive Receiving” — Passing to Space is easier for beginning soccer players and will result in much better soccer ball movement, better soccer ball possession, use of Open Space and “field vision”. Aggressive Receiving” is a better way to teach receiving and will result in a big improvement in your soccer players and their ability to retain the soccer ball.


    Soccer Last Defender


    The defender (not counting the goalkeeper) who is closest to the goal you are attacking. (The goalkeeper is usually the actual last defender, but it is easier to teach this concept by referring to the last field player as the “Last Defender”).This is an important concept to teach because you may want your center forward to play within 2 steps of the Last Defender. The “Last Defender” is usually as far as a forward can “push up” without the ball & still be “onside”. You want your forwards to stay 2 steps behind the last Defender so they won’t be as likely to be called offside. It is hard to dribble past the Last Defenders. The best way to break through them is by “through balls”, “give & go’s” or “passing to yourself”. (See “Offside Rule“, “Push Up“, “Through Ball“, “Pass To Yourself” & “Pass To Space“).


    Soccer Hopped Pass


    A short “chip” or “flick pass” that is kicked into the air high enough to go over outstretched legs. This can be effective near the goal or when “passing to yourself” to beat a defender. (See “Pass To Yourself“, “Flick Pass“, “Chip” & “Air Ball“).


    Soccer Dribbling


    (aka Carrying) A player can dribble with any part of the foot. “Control dribbling” is usually with the inside or outside of the foot. “Speed dribbling” is often with the top of the foot (i.e., the “laces”). See “Soccer When To Dribble“, “Control Soccer Dribbling“, “Speed Soccer Dribbling” & “Soccer Pass To Yourself“. See How to Teach Soccer Dribbling.