The following posts have been tagged with "soccer offside rule"...

Soccer Throw-In


This is a type of “Set Play.”  See the review of “Coaching Set Plays” for Set Play Tactics. Soccer Throw-ins are very important because each team will take 25 or more of them during a game. When the soccer ball goes out of bounds over the side line (i.e. the “touch line”), it is “out” on the team that last touched the ball before it crossed totally over the side line, and the opposing team is allowed to get the ball and one of their soccer players (often the closest, or a player designated by the coach to take the throw-ins) is allowed to inbound the ball by picking it up with his hands and throwing it back onto the field. This is called a “throw-in”. This is the only time a player other than the Goalkeeper is legally allowed to pick up the ball with his hands. For a throw-in to be legal: (a) the ball must be thrown from behind & over the head (b) it must be thrown using both hands (c) the thrower must face the field (d) at the instant the ball leaves the thrower’s hands, some part of both feet must be on the ground, either on or outside the side line (e) the ball must be throw-in from the place where it went out of bounds (Referee’s usually let the throw-in be taken from the approximate point where the ball went out of bounds, and you rarely see arguments about this). If the thrown ball does not enter the field, the throw-in is retaken by the same team. The thrower may not touch the ball again until it has touched another player. The penalty for an illegal throw-in is that your team loses the ball & the other team gets to take a throw-in from the same spot. A goal may not be scored on a direct throw-in (i.e., it doesn’t count if it is thrown into the soccer goal without another player touching it first). A player is not offside if he receives the ball direct from a throw-in. An opponent must stay at least 2 meters from the thrower and can be given a yellow card for standing closer than 2 meters (note that this rule probably won’t be enforced at very young ages). Also, an opponent is guilty of unsporting behavior and should be given a yellow card if he unfairly distracts or impedes the thrower (e.g., by jumping around, shouting or making gestures to intentionally distract the thrower, or by jumping in front of the thrower). When a throw-in is awarded the Assistant Referee will point the flag in the direction in which the attackers will advance (i.e. toward the goal of the team it is out on). (See “Soccer Offside Rule“, and “Assistant Soccer Referee“). See the Soccer Throw-Ins Navigation Page


Soccer Corner Kick


(aka Corners). A corner kick in soccer is a method of restarting play. When the ball goes out of bounds over the soccer end line (aka the ‘Goal Line’) and was last touched by the defending team, the attacking team inbounds it from the nearest corner by kicking it in from the Soccer Field Corner Arc (note: this doesn’t apply if a goal was scored). Defenders must stay 6 yards back if U-8, 8 yards if U-10 & 10 yards back if U-12 or older. (If they don’t, they might get a soccer yellow card). The ball may be placed anywhere inside the Corner Arc or on the Corner Arc lines. There are 2 types of corners: a “Long Corner in soccer” and a “soccer Short Corner“. A player is not offside if he receives the ball from a Corner Kick. The ball is in play when it is kicked and moves. A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick. The kicker may not play the ball a second time until it has touched another player. (See “Short Corner” & “Soccer Long Corner“, and “Soccer Offside Rule“).

Below is what the official FIFA rules say about Corner Kicks:

A corner kick is a method of restarting play.

A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick, but only against the opposing team.

A corner kick is awarded when the entire ball, having last touched a player of the defending team, passes over the goal line, either on the ground or in the air, and a soccer goal is not scored in accordance with Law 10. Law 10 is “The Method of Scoring” and basically says that a goal is scored when the entire ball — not just part of the ball — passes over the goal line, between the goal posts and under the crossbar, provided there wasn’t a foul or a law broken in the process of scoring the goal (an example of when a goal would be disallowed is if the team scoring the goal was “offside“). Click here to see a diagram of a soccer field.

Procedure:

  • The ball is placed inside the corner arc at the nearest corner flagpost.
  • The corner flagpost is not moved.
  • Opponents remain at least 9.15 m (10 yds) from the corner arc until the ball is in play.
  • The ball is kicked by a player of the attacking team.
  • The ball is in play when it is kicked and moves.
  • The kicker does not play the ball a second time until it has touched another player.


Soccer Short Corner


A soccer corner kick where the soccer ball is put into play with a short pass instead of a long soccer kick. Once put into play, the “Offside Rule” applies. (See “Corner Kick” and “Long Corner“). See “Short Corner Set-Play & Corner Kick Attacking Strategies” on Premium.


Soccer Rules


The basic soccer rules are described in these Definitions. See “Advantage Clause“, “Cards”, “Fouls”, “Hand Ball”, “Offside Rule”, “Shoulder Charge”, “Assistant Referee”, “FIFA”, “Corner Kick”, “Free Kick”, “Goal Kick”, “Kick Off”, “Lines“, “Penalty Kick”, “Substitutions” & “Throw-Ins”. Also, see “Rules” and “Safety Rules”, Basic Information & Tips for Beginning Coaches. Soccer rules are revised annually by FIFA. You can visit www.fifa.com. for the latest official soccer rules, which are called the “Laws of The Game”.


Soccer Offside Trap


When defenders (often a “flat defense”) intentionally move forward to try to “trap” an attacker who doesn’t have the soccer ball in an offside position. Don’t try to teach this to youth soccer teams; it is too complex. However, you can teach your soccer team to stay 12-18 steps away from your goal when the other soccer team has a Free Kick, which is a similar concept and will keep the attackers from scoring on headers or rebounds off the Free Kick. (Defenders must stay 10 yards from the soccer ball on free kicks, so this will only work if the kick is from 20-30 yards out). Remember, the Offside Rule is in effect on Free Kicks. (See “Flat Defense” and “Offside Rule, Detailed“).


Soccer Offside Rule (Simplified)


If “offside” is called in your age bracket, you can teach this simple version: You are not offside if you are doing any of the following:

  1. Are in your own half of the soccer field (your half is the half your goalkeeper is on). Or,
  • Are even with or behind the soccer ball. Or,
  • Don’t go past the “Second Last Defender” (The goalkeeper is usually, but not always, the last defender; this might be the case if the goalkeeper is out of goal). Or,
  • Receive the soccer ball direct from a goal kick, corner kick or throw-in. (But you can be offside if you receive it direct on a “free kick”). Or,
  • Are the ballhandler (the ballhandler can be closer to the goal than the soccer ball if he has his back to the goal).
  • The penalty for Offside is that an Indirect Free Kick is awarded to the opposing soccer team to be taken from the place where the offside occurred.

    When my forwards “push up” without the soccer ball, I tell them to stay 2 steps behind the Last Defender (not counting the goalkeeper) so they are less likely to be caught offside or to be accidentally called offside. (See “Played” & “Offside Rule, Detailed“).


    Soccer Last Defender


    The defender (not counting the goalkeeper) who is closest to the goal you are attacking. (The goalkeeper is usually the actual last defender, but it is easier to teach this concept by referring to the last field player as the “Last Defender”).This is an important concept to teach because you may want your center forward to play within 2 steps of the Last Defender. The “Last Defender” is usually as far as a forward can “push up” without the ball & still be “onside”. You want your forwards to stay 2 steps behind the last Defender so they won’t be as likely to be called offside. It is hard to dribble past the Last Defenders. The best way to break through them is by “through balls”, “give & go’s” or “passing to yourself”. (See “Offside Rule“, “Push Up“, “Through Ball“, “Pass To Yourself” & “Pass To Space“).


    Soccer Free Kick


    When one team is penalized, the other usually gets a “free kick”. There are 2 types of free kicks (direct & indirect) and a special type of Direct Free Kick called a Penalty Kick:

    • Direct Free Kick – Where a goal may be scored by kicking the ball directly into the opponent’s goal without anyone else touching it (although it still counts if someone else does touch it).
  • Indirect Free Kick – On which a goal may be scored only if another player touches the ball before it enters the goal. Question: “How do you know if a free kick is indirect’” Answer: “The referee will raise his arm above his head and leave it up until the ball is kicked”. On an indirect kick you should have one player gently tap the ball so another player standing behind the ball can kick it; or pass it to someone who shoots it. If on an Indirect Free Kick the ball is kicked into the goal without anyone else touching it (other than the kicker) the goal does not count and the other team is awarded a goal kick. However, if the ball is touched by a player on either team, including the goalkeeper, before it goes into the goal, the goal counts.
  • Penalty Kick – When a player commits a foul within his own Penalty Box, which would normally result in a Direct Free Kick, the other team is given a Penalty Kick (”PK”). (See “Penalty Kick”). On Penalty Kicks, everyone but the kicker & goalkeeper must stay out of the Penalty Box until the kicker moves the ball.

    On Direct & Indirect Free Kicks, defenders must stay away from the kicker (6 yards if U-8, 8 yards if U-10 & 10 yards for U-12 & older) until a player on the kicking team moves the ball, if they don’t they can receive a yellow card. (See “Fouls“, “Hand Ball“, “Cards“, “Offside Rule“, & “Penalty Kick“. Go to www.fifa.com. for more details). The Offside Rule applies on Free Kicks.