The following posts have been tagged with "soccer free kick"...

Soccer Wall


In Soccer, at U-8 & older, when the other team has a free soccer kick, you may want to have your soccer players stand side-by-side between the ball & their soccer goal so they form a “wall” so the kicker doesn’t have a straight shot on soccer goal. They will have to stand the required distance back (usually 6 yards for U-8, 8 yards for U-10 & 10 yards for U-12 & older) & they can be given yellow soccer cards if they are too close (although the Referee almost always gives a warning first).


Soccer Rules


The basic soccer rules are described in these Definitions. See “Advantage Clause“, “Cards”, “Fouls”, “Hand Ball”, “Offside Rule”, “Shoulder Charge”, “Assistant Referee”, “FIFA”, “Corner Kick”, “Free Kick”, “Goal Kick”, “Kick Off”, “Lines“, “Penalty Kick”, “Substitutions” & “Throw-Ins”. Also, see “Rules” and “Safety Rules”, Basic Information & Tips for Beginning Coaches. Soccer rules are revised annually by FIFA. You can visit www.fifa.com. for the latest official soccer rules, which are called the “Laws of The Game”.


Soccer Offside Rule (Simplified)


If “offside” is called in your age bracket, you can teach this simple version: You are not offside if you are doing any of the following:

  1. Are in your own half of the soccer field (your half is the half your goalkeeper is on). Or,
  • Are even with or behind the soccer ball. Or,
  • Don’t go past the “Second Last Defender” (The goalkeeper is usually, but not always, the last defender; this might be the case if the goalkeeper is out of goal). Or,
  • Receive the soccer ball direct from a goal kick, corner kick or throw-in. (But you can be offside if you receive it direct on a “free kick”). Or,
  • Are the ballhandler (the ballhandler can be closer to the goal than the soccer ball if he has his back to the goal).
  • The penalty for Offside is that an Indirect Free Kick is awarded to the opposing soccer team to be taken from the place where the offside occurred.

    When my forwards “push up” without the soccer ball, I tell them to stay 2 steps behind the Last Defender (not counting the goalkeeper) so they are less likely to be caught offside or to be accidentally called offside. (See “Played” & “Offside Rule, Detailed“).


    Soccer Indirect Free Kick


    (aka “Indirect Kick”). A type of “free kick” given after minor fouls such as obstruction. On an indirect kick, another player (on either team) must touch the ball before a goal can be scored. Question: “How do you know if a free kick is indirect’” Answer: “The referee will raise his arm above his head and leave it up until the ball is kicked”. On an indirect kick you should have one player gently tap the ball so another player standing behind the ball can kick it; or pass it to someone who shoots it. If on an Indirect Free Kick the ball is kicked into the goal without anyone else touching it (other than the kicker) the goal does not count and the other team is awarded a goal kick. However, if the ball is touched by a player on either team, including the goalkeeper, before it goes into the goal, the goal counts.(See “Free Kick” & “Fouls“).


    Soccer Free Kick


    When one team is penalized, the other usually gets a “free kick”. There are 2 types of free kicks (direct & indirect) and a special type of Direct Free Kick called a Penalty Kick:

    • Direct Free Kick – Where a goal may be scored by kicking the ball directly into the opponent’s goal without anyone else touching it (although it still counts if someone else does touch it).
  • Indirect Free Kick – On which a goal may be scored only if another player touches the ball before it enters the goal. Question: “How do you know if a free kick is indirect’” Answer: “The referee will raise his arm above his head and leave it up until the ball is kicked”. On an indirect kick you should have one player gently tap the ball so another player standing behind the ball can kick it; or pass it to someone who shoots it. If on an Indirect Free Kick the ball is kicked into the goal without anyone else touching it (other than the kicker) the goal does not count and the other team is awarded a goal kick. However, if the ball is touched by a player on either team, including the goalkeeper, before it goes into the goal, the goal counts.
  • Penalty Kick – When a player commits a foul within his own Penalty Box, which would normally result in a Direct Free Kick, the other team is given a Penalty Kick (”PK”). (See “Penalty Kick”). On Penalty Kicks, everyone but the kicker & goalkeeper must stay out of the Penalty Box until the kicker moves the ball.

    On Direct & Indirect Free Kicks, defenders must stay away from the kicker (6 yards if U-8, 8 yards if U-10 & 10 yards for U-12 & older) until a player on the kicking team moves the ball, if they don’t they can receive a yellow card. (See “Fouls“, “Hand Ball“, “Cards“, “Offside Rule“, & “Penalty Kick“. Go to www.fifa.com. for more details). The Offside Rule applies on Free Kicks.


  • Soccer Direct Kick


    A type of soccer “free kick” given after severe fouls such as hitting or kicking. On a direct kick, a goal can be scored by kicking the ball into the soccer goal without it first touching another player. (See “Free Soccer Kick” & “Soccer Fouls“).