The following posts have been tagged with "soccer fouls"...

Soccer Worrying The Goalkeeper


It is a soccer foul to harass, interfere with, or obstruct the soccer Goalkeeper by trying to keep him from putting the ball into play (e.g., if an opponent stands directly in front of the Goalkeeper when he is trying to punt the ball). Punishable by a Yellow Card and an indirect kick. (See “Soccer Cards” & “Soccer Fouls“).


Soccer Warning


Often a soccer referee will give a soccer player an informal warning before he gives a yellow soccer card. Soccer players should take any warning very seriously because the next time the behavior is repeated a card will probably be given (See “Soccer Cards” & “Soccer Fouls“).


Soccer Tackle


To steal the ball. Mostly done while standing (see “Shoulder Charge” & “Block Tackle“), but also see “Slide Tackle“. (Also see “Fouls“).


Soccer Slide Tackle


When a defender slides on the ground and attempts to kick the ball away from the ballhandler. If the tackle is careless, reckless or uses excessive force or the tackler first contacts the ballhandler instead of the ball, a foul should be called. If the tackle is from behind (from an angle that doesn’t allow the ballhandler to see it coming) a “Red Card” can be given. Some youth & adult leagues don’t allow slide tackling because too many injuries result. I don’t teach it & don’t allow it. Beside the possibility of getting hurt or hurting someone else, you can’t play if you are laying on the ground. (See “Tackle” and “Fouls“).


Soccer Shoulder Charge


(aka “Fair Charging”). A type of “tackle” which can be legally used to try to “win” (i.e., gain possession of) the ball. To be legal, it: (a) cannot take place from behind (b) is only permitted within playing distance (i.e., 3 feet) of the ball (c) cannot be violent or dangerous (d) must be intended to win the ball & not just to knock down the opponent (e) must be shoulder to shoulder (not to the opponents chest or back) with the arms (especially elbows) close to the body (f) the player must have at least one foot on the ground (i.e., he can’t leap). (See “Tackle“, “Fouls“, “Shielding“, “Strength On the Ball” & “Win The Ball“).


Soccer Sandwiching


A foul occurring when 2 or more soccer teammates “hold” an opponent by boxing him in. Penalized by a direct kick. (See “Fouls“).


Soccer Rules


The basic soccer rules are described in these Definitions. See “Advantage Clause“, “Cards”, “Fouls”, “Hand Ball”, “Offside Rule”, “Shoulder Charge”, “Assistant Referee”, “FIFA”, “Corner Kick”, “Free Kick”, “Goal Kick”, “Kick Off”, “Lines“, “Penalty Kick”, “Substitutions” & “Throw-Ins”. Also, see “Rules” and “Safety Rules”, Basic Information & Tips for Beginning Coaches. Soccer rules are revised annually by FIFA. You can visit www.fifa.com. for the latest official soccer rules, which are called the “Laws of The Game”.


Soccer Punting


The key to consistent punting is to face the target “square” & a consistent drop. Children’s hands are small. Teach your young goalkeepers to hold the soccer ball with 2 hands, fully extend the arms & drop the soccer ball from waist height. This will result in a consistent drop. If punts are too low (not enough height) it means the soccer ball is being contacted too low. If too much height & not enough distance, it is being contacted too high. The goalkeeper has six seconds after picking up the soccer ball to punt it or release it. He is allowed to pick it up, run with it and then punt, throw it, or drop it and dribble or kick it. However, he cannot touch it with his hands outside the “Penalty Box” and once he drops it he can’t touch it again with his hands until an opponent has touched it. (See “Fouls, Indirect“, “Distribute“, “Goalkeeper” & “Penalty Box“).


Soccer Penalty


See “Fouls” and “Penalty Box“.


Soccer Obstruction


See “Fouls, Indirect Kick, Impeding the Progress of an Opponent”.


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